06 April 2018
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Pay gap in NHS England revealed women earn 23% less than men

The figures show that the average full-time female worker earns £28,702 per annum, which is 23% less than men who earn £37,470.

Women in NHS England earn 23% less than men according to data compiled by NHS Digital and submitted in the nationwide report

Women in NHS England earn 23% less than men according to data compiled by NHS Digital and submitted in the nationwide report.

The figures show that the average full-time female worker earns £28,702 per annum, which is 23% less than men who earn £37,470.

Collected across one million employees, the data covers all workers from doctors and nurses to managers and cleaners.

‘It reflects the fact that men are more likely to make it into senior positions. It is the same issue we have seen in the rest of the economy,’ said Sally Davies, of the Medical Women’s Federation, to the BBC.

‘I think it raises serious questions for the NHS and government. I would like to know what they are going to do about it.’

All employers across Britain with over 250 employees had to submit their data by midnight last Wednesday.

While NHS England pays their employees in a band system, the 23% pay gap demonstrates that there are fewer women in higher paying roles than men.

These figures don’t include bonuses or overtime and they show the mean rather than median averages and provide a breakdown for doctors of all bands.

Between doctors, the pay gap is 15% but this figure rises to 26% when including part-time workers. This means the average pay for all male doctors is £88,613, which is £23,377 more than women who earn £65,236.

A spokesperson from the Department of Health and Social Care said: ‘We are committed to ensuring that our hardworking NHS staff are rewarded fairly and equally for their work regardless of gender.’

‘The department is working closely with NHS organisations to support them in closing their gender pay gaps and has committed to an independent review of the gender pay gap in medicine.’

Author
Rebecca Gilroy

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